FAQs


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POWER SYSTEMS, FIT & Micro-FIT

RIDES


POWER SYSTEMS, FIT & Micro-FIT


Why do I need an engineer?
For a FIT installation greater than 10KW, a professional (electrical) engineer licensed in the Province of Ontario is required to sign and seal the single line drawing for the Connection Impact Assessment (CIA) as well as the CIA Application itself. An engineer is also required as part of the commissioning process and to conduct the Independent Engineer Review on completion of commissioning. The building permit drawings are also required to be signed and sealed by a (structural) engineer. Whilst it is not a requirement to have other work completed by an engineer, the design and construction of a FIT system is essentially electrical power generation and so it would be prudent to engage electrical and structural engineers to be involved in all stages of a project from initial OPA approval and processing to design and construction to commissioning. For microFIT projects 10KW or less, the building permit drawings are required to be signed and sealed by an engineer. The system design and single line drawing required for electrical inspection does not have to be prepared by an engineer. However, the ESA inspection is focused on safety and not whether the system will operate and perform to specification. An engineer will be able to provide this level of input.
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How impartial is an engineering firm?
Ideally an engineer should be independent of equipment manufacturers, vendors, and constructors so that they can provide impartial design and engineering advice.
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How long does it take to develop a FIT project?
OPA approval for microFIT projects may take a few weeks to months. Design and permit application preparation usually take two to three weeks in duration depending on location, revisions to plan and equipment manufacturer. FIT projects take much longer. The OPA approval process will take several months. Once approved the CIA, ESA Plan Review, electrical and building permits may take 4 months and likely more.
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How much will the engineering involvement cost?
This depends on the generating technology, installation type and location. Contact us for estimates for your location.
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What should I be asking when selecting an engineer?
Reference clients, examples of projects similar to yours, example designs (non-disclosure of commercially sensitive information will likely be required), credentials, description of the FIT project development process, scope of involvement, whether they are compensated by manufacturers/vendors or not, Certificate of Authorization from Professional Engineers Ontario, Professional Liability Insurance. A suggested few of many areas to discuss.
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RIDES


How long does this take, and what does it cost?
These are the first questions that we are asked, and the most difficult to answer. Please allow at least four to six weeks for the entire application process, preferably longer for a larger mechanical ride. During spring and early summer both ourselves and TSSA can be overwhelmed with new ride applications and this inevitably means delays in both preparing the application and getting it through TSSA. If you leave it to the last minute, it is most probable that you will not get it approved in time for your bookings.

As for cost: we will try to give you a quotation before we start the job. For inflatables we have a fixed fee regardless of what size or type, but for mechanical rides it can be very difficult to give an exact quote. During the application process many things can emerge that require extra work on our part. Ontario is one of the strictest jurisdictions in North America, and is getting tougher - a ride that is licensed elsewhere may not be acceptable here without modifications. In addition, TSSA will charge you for their engineering review and inspection on an hourly basis. We advise that you call us to discuss the details.
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Can you Guarantee that a Ride will be Licensed?
The vast majority of rides we handle do get certified with few, if any, issues. We cannot however guarantee that any ride will be acceptable due to different and stringent requirements in Ontario. In some instances a ride that is approved elsewhere in Canada may require extensive (and expensive) modifications to operate in Ontario.
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Are there any rides that are banned in Ontario?
Yes. Portable bungee devices are not allowed here (with the exception of inflatable "Bungee Run" devices). If you have such a device, you will have to register it as permanent. Again we suggest you talk to us about it.
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How about approvals in other Provinces? Or the USA?
We have obtained approvals in BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia. Please contact us for more details, or to discuss other Provincial approvals. As for the USA, each state has its own rules and we have been able to get approval in some of them, including New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Texas, Maryland and others. Since the rules are changing down there, and acceptance of Ontario P. Eng. certification varies, you should contact us with specific requests. We do have affiliates in the USA who can help out as well.
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Can I get my ride registered in New Jersey?
The procedure in New Jersey is similar to Ontario, but is generally done at the manufacturer's level, rather than the users'. New Jersey also allows category registration in which a single application can cover a family of similar inflatable devices. This approach greatly simplifies the process, especially as there are numerous very similar designs in every manufacturer's catalog. Please give us a call if you have any questions regarding this process.
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What are the Rules for Amusement Devices in Ontario?
To ensure updated forms, fees, and regulations visit the Amusement Devices web page of the TSSA.

In addition, rides have to satisfy the requirements of CSA Standard Z267-00. To buy a copy go to the CSA Website.
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